How Dermatologists Help With Acne

How to Prepare for Your Dermatology Appointment for Acne

It’s time for your first dermatology appointment, and you want to be prepared. While you may not feel like celebrating, it actually is a big deal. This appointment is the first step on your path to clear skin. To get the most from this appointment, a little preparation is in order. This will help you feel confident in your treatment plan, and ensure you get the results you want. Here are a few easy things you can do to get ready for your upcoming appointment with the dermatologist.

Write Down All of Your Questions

Before you go see the dermatologist, make a list of any questions you have. Some questions you may want to ask: What type of acne do I have? What can I do in the short term to improve my acne? How long will it take to see results? Or anything else you would like to know. Bring that list of questions with you to your appointment. When you’re in the exam room, it’s hard to remember everything you wanted to ask your dermatologist. You don’t want to be out in the parking lot after the appointment before realizing you forgot to ask a question or two that you desperately wanted answered.

Be Prepared to Answer Some Questions, Too

Your dermatologist will have some questions for you too. Like, how long have you had acne? And, what treatments have you tried so far? Be ready to answer questions about your medical history as well, even issues that don’t necessarily have to do with your skin. Your dermatologist will ask about any health issues, past and present. They will also want to know about family’s health history if they’ve had acne or skin cancer for example. The doctor isn’t being nosy. Your dermatologist will need to know all about your health, and not just your skin health, in order to properly help you.

Bring a List of All Acne Treatment Products You’re Currently Using

Make a note of any treatment you’re currently using for your acne, both prescription medications, over-the-counter acne treatments, and skin care products. It’s more important to list the active ingredients in your over-the-counter products than the actual name of the product. For example, instead of just writing down Oxy, note that the active ingredient is 5 percent benzoyl peroxide. Be prepared to tell the dermatologist everything you’ve previously tried, how long you used it, and what type of results you had.

Bring a List of All Other Medications You’re Taking

Your dermatologist will also need to know about any other medications you’re using, even if they have nothing to do with acne. If you don’t know off the top of your head the specific names, check the label and write it down prior to your appointment. This is important to avoid any potential drug interactions between the medications you’re currently using and new acne medications your derm may prescribe.

 

 

There is no one-size-fits-all solution to acne.

All the dermatologists we talked to agreed on this point. Every patient responds to treatments differently, and sometimes it can get worse before it gets better. But finding the right treatment for you is part of acne self-care, and with the help of your dermatologist, you can find an acne treatment regimen that’s best for your skin. And yes, it really is helpful to work with a derm to get it right—especially if your acne is more than occasional or mild.

First, your derm will examine your skin to determine the severity of your acne to give it a grade (grade 1 is mild; grade 4 is severe) and figure out which type (or types) you have, the AAD explains. Then, they’ll see which type of treatment would work best: topical or oral (or both). Here’s the difference between each, per the AAD:

  • Topical acne treatment: This is the most common type of acne treatment. Some work by killing acne-causing bacteria while others get rid of acne by decreasing oil. The ingredients in topical acne treatments may include retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, or salicylic acid.
  • Oral acne treatment: These medications, which work internally, are prescribed when you have red, swollen pimples (acne cysts and nodules). They can come in different forms such as antibiotics (which kill bacteria and decrease inflammation), birth control pills (which helps with hormonal acne), and isotretinoin (commonly referred to as Accutane, even though that specific brand has been discontinued).

 

What can you do to prevent it

Eating healthy, staying hydrated, getting enough sleep and exercising are great places to start when it comes to acne and getting good skin. Since acne is linked to inflammation and hormones, taking a total body approach is more likely to help than focusing on specific skincare products that can only do so much.

That said, maintaining a good skincare regimen is recommended by dermatologists. You don’t need to buy expensive products to do that either. A simple face wash, moisturizer and a targeted serum (like one with acne-fighting ingredients like benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid) can go a long way. Don’t forget to wash your face, especially before bed to prevent clogged pores and a buildup of oil.

lways remove your makeup, and cleanse after you go to the gym, too. Sweating at the gym and leaving without cleansing (even if it’s just for an hour or so) is a recipe for clogged pores fast. You don’t want all the dirt, bacteria, sweat and oil to hang out on your skin for too long.

 

You Can Treat It

While a pimple will eventually go away, if you have outbreaks a lot, the skin problem that brings it on typically won’t go away by itself. And if you don’t treat it, you could end up with scars.

A skin doctor (dermatologist) can help. She might suggest a cream, lotion, gel, or soap that contains ingredients that can help. Many can be bought without a prescription:

  • Benzoyl peroxide kills bacteria and removes extra oil.
  • Resorcinol is for whiteheads and blackheads.
  • Salicylic acid keeps pores from getting clogged.
  • Sulfur removes dead skin cells.
  • Spironolactone blocks excess hormone.

For more serious acne, your doctor may prescribe:

  • Antibiotics to kill bacteria
  • Birth control pills for women with acne due to hormones
  • Isotretinoin to help you make less oil

You may need a combination of oral medicine and a cream or lotion. Don’t stop using your treatments if your skin clears. Stick with it until the doctor tells you to stop. This can help keep acne from coming back.

 

Determine if your dermatology needs are medical, surgical, or cosmetic

Chances are you have a concern you want to solve, but not every dermatologist is suitable. Dermatologic care, like any other type of medical care, must be specific to your needs as a patient. This is a transactional service after all.

you should start by asking yourself if your needs are:

  • medical (e.g. cystic acne or rosacea)
  • surgical (e.g. removal of a benign growth or nodular melanoma)
  • cosmetic (e.g. facial sculpting)

They can even be all the above or a combo of two. For example, eye bag removal is both cosmetic and surgical.

Ideally, you should choose a dermatologist whose specialty most closely aligns with your needs. When in doubt, call the doctor’s office and ask if the dermatologist you’re likely to see is experienced in treating your specific areas of concern.

If they imply that they may not be right for you or that you require a specialty service they don’t offer, don’t be afraid to keep looking.

Some Tips To Choose A Veterinarian

The Best Vet for Your Pet

As a pet owner, developing a trusting relationship with your veterinarian is an integral aspect of your dog or cat’s health. Just as we put a great deal of thought into choosing our own doctor, we want to have a competent and knowledgeable person whom we trust to care for our pets. Whether starting from scratch and adopting a new pet or simply moving to a new city or state, there comes a point when every pet owner has to choose a veterinarian. For some people, finding the perfect vet is as simple as searching the internet for the nearest office. For others, there are more factors to consider: the veterinarian, the support staff, cost of services and the location of the veterinary office, to name a few.

It’s up to you to weigh all the factors and decide which are most important to you. Perhaps you have a cat or dog who does not tolerate long car rides; therefore, finding a veterinary office that is close to home might take precedence. Many owners will be willing to travel a little farther for a veterinarian they like and trust will make good decisions for their pet. The friendliness of the staff and comfort level of the office are also important considerations. While it’s true that most pets don’t love going to see the veterinarian, you want to make sure to give your pet the most pleasant experience possible.

So how do you choose? Word of mouth is probably your best bet. Having a trusted friend or even an acquaintance that already has an established relationship with a veterinarian can go a long way. If you’re new to the area, visit a local dog park or pet store and ask other owners where they take their pets. You could end up with a great recommendation. If you’re moving, don’t feel shy about asking your current veterinary office for suggestions for a new clinic. I have had clients do this, and, quite often, I have old classmates in the area to whom I can refer them. At the very least, I can come up with a referral through another veterinarian friend.

What to Look for in a Veterinary Clinic

An ideal veterinary office should be clean, well-organized and comfortable. Every clinic has their share of hectic days, but, overall, the staff should conduct themselves in a friendly, helpful and professional manner. They should be attentive and willing to answer your questions and/or accommodate your pet’s needs

Evaluating a New Veterinarian

When evaluating a new veterinary clinic for the first time, take your pet in for a wellness exam, if possible. Assessing a new veterinary office can be much more difficult when dealing with the emotional stress of having a sick pet. Make sure to go prepared with your pet’s medical records, including a full history of his or her vaccinations and a summary of any past health issues. Most clinics, breeders or adoption agencies should be able to provide you with your pet’s pertinent history upon request. The more information you supply for your new veterinarian, the better equipped he or she will be to give recommendations regarding the best care for your pet.

 

Things to Consider When Choosing a Veterinarian

As pet parents, we take great joy in picking out the perfect collar and matching leash, the most comfy bed, and cutest dishes we can find for our pets. It goes without saying, taking the time to choose your pet’s veterinarian is one of the most important things you can do for your pet

What is their philosophy? Does it coincide with mine?

We believe that pets are truly a part of the family dynamic, and that the human animal bond is important. At The Drake Center, we aim to ensure that every human and animal who walks through our doors receives a one-of-a-kind veterinary experience. This unique level of service is based on a dedication to quality patient care called The Drake Center Difference.

How do the veterinarians and staff treat you and your pet? How many doctors are at the practice?

If you’re in the market for a place to take your pets for their medical needs, we encourage you to come in for a “happy visit” and simply meet our amazing staff.

Vet techs and assistants: Do they seem knowledgeable about and sensitive to animals?

We pride ourselves in staffing amazing vet techs, tech assistants, and receptionists. Many have been working at The Drake Center for over 15 years and have a genuine passion for animals. In addition, we strive to make you feel like you are a part of our family from the moment you walk in the door.

Is your veterinary hospital accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA)?

Did you know that only 12% of veterinary practices are accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association? AAHA holds animal hospitals to the highest level of care, requiring they pass a 900 point inspection.

 

How To Pick The Best Vet

I once got in a fight with a veterinarian while my dog, Sereno, lay in agony on an exam table. He had “bloated”—his stomach had twisted and filled with air. It was a deadly problem I’d seen many times as a vet tech, and I knew that if we didn’t release some of the air with a stomach tube or get him into surgery pronto, he was going to die.

I was on vacation in rural West Virginia and had just driven 45 miles at top speed looking for a vet. This was the first clinic I saw: tiny, with a broken screen door and a hand-painted sign that said veterinarian. Sereno looked like he’d swallowed a beach ball, and when I tapped his stomach, it made the telltale pinging sound of a bloated dog. But the vet suggested a blood test to rule out kidney failure. I asked her to take an X-ray. She did—I saw what looked like unequivocal bloat on the film, but she wasn’t sure.

That’s when I lost it. I’d helped pump countless dogs’ stomachs as a tech—it’s tricky and takes more than one person, but at that point I was desperate. “Can I just have a stomach tube?” I snapped. “I’ll do it myself.”

First, I asked myself, What do all good vets I know have in common? They didn’t stop learning after vet school—they did internships and took continuing education classes. Most work at clinics accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). So I searched online for AAHA hospitals. I visited each clinic’s website to look at its vets’ educational backgrounds: Multiple internships got bonus points; so did residencies. I also looked for the abbreviation ABVP after the vets’ names, because it means they did extra work to be certified by the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. That narrowed my list of clinics from 170 to 3. Only then did I check what is often people’s first criterion: location.

I made appointments with each clinic, starting with the closest one. I planned to try all three. But then I walked into the first clinic and told the vet—as I always do—that I’m a pain because I’m a former vet tech who asks a lot of questions. He laughed, then spent 45 minutes examining my dogs and talking with me. He referred me to a board-certified dermatologist for my young dog’s allergies and mentioned a new treatment he wanted to try for a problem my older dog’s had for years. I went home and canceled my other appointments.

 

Choosing a vet

How do vet practices work?

Some veterinary practices operate with just one veterinary surgeon and one member of staff. Others may have 15 of more vets with a similar number of nursing and support staff.

Practices may operate on more than one site – the main practice being supported by 3 or more branch surgeries. The branch surgeries may have limited on-site facilities and equipment, but they allow you to see a vet without having to travel long distances.

Facilities do vary between practices. Some may have extensive equipment and facilities on-site, while others contract some services out to specialist firms or labs. Similarly, veterinary surgeons may refer unusual or complicated cases to veterinary surgeons who specialise in a particular species or discipline.

What is 24-hour cover?

Whatever the size of the premises, veterinary surgeons have to make sure that 24-hour emergency cover is available for their clients every day of the week.

They can do this in several ways; a practice may provide this themselves, or some practices get together locally to provide this service, which may mean that you have to travel to a different practice in a emergency

 

How to Choose a Good Vet

Veterinary care is mandatory in your pet’s life. Whether it’s a cat, a dog, a parrot, rabbit, or an iguana. From the moment a new family member of any species arrives home, we should give them all the conditions they need to live happily beside us. Periodic visits to the vet are one of the key points of any animal’s health.

Each species requires specific care that can include de-worming, vaccinations or only periodic visits as preventative measures to ensure that all is well. Many carers only take their pet to the vet when the animal becomes sick. Don’t make this mistake. Even before adopting an animal you should look for a veterinarian

Legalization of the clinic

This is undoubtedly point number 1. Unfortunately, there are many ‘fake vets”and clinics that are not legalized. The role of Justice is to detect these cases of fraud but all carers should be aware and conscious that these cases exist and may be closer than you think.

Only a veterinary doctor that has had the required training and practice needed can perform medical acts with animals. Don’t take your dog to be vaccinated by the worker of the Pet shop, nor to your neighbor to get “cheap shots”. Cheap ends up being expensive and your animal’s health is priceless!

Location

The question of the location of the clinic or veterinary hospital is relative. Ideally, a clinic near your home is the most indicated to avoid the stress of travelling with the animal and the time it takes to get to the clinic in case of emergency. However, driving a few extra miles may be worth it to receive better services. You will always have to assess the pros and cons.

Admittance To Any Pain Management Center Will Offer Multi Discipline Comprehensive Care

Joint Pain Relief: What You Can Do to Feel Better Now

Why joints hurt

Pain in your joints can have many different causes. For many people, joint pain is caused by arthritis, a group of conditions marked by inflammation in the joints.

About 23 percentTrusted Source of adults in the United States have arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis. This type is caused by a breakdown of cartilage as you age.

For others, joint pain may be caused by an injury or infection of the joints, or another condition, such as fibromyalgia or even depression. It can also be the result of poor posture or long periods of inactivity.

Treatment options for joint pain

If you’re experiencing joint pain and don’t know why, make an appointment to see a doctor to determine the cause.

Medications for joint pain

Your doctor may first suggest that you treat the joint pain caused by arthritis with anti-inflammatory and pain medications.

 

Pain and pain management

Pain is a very common condition. The occurrence of pain rises as people get older, and women are more likely to experience pain than men

Pain may be anything from a dull ache to a sharp stab and can range from mild to extreme. You may feel pain in one part of your body or it may be widespread.

How pain affects the body

Pain is a complex protective mechanism. It is an essential part of evolution that protects the body from danger and harm.

The body has pain receptors that are attached to two main types of nerves that detect danger. One nerve type relays messages quickly, causing a sharp, sudden pain. The other relays messages slowly, causing a dull, throbbing pain.

Some areas of the body have more pain receptors than others. For example, the skin has lots of receptors so it is easy to tell the exact location and type of pain. There are far fewer receptors in the gut, so it is harder to pinpoint the precise location of a stomach ache.

 

Savvy Shopping Tips for OTC Medicines

Overuse of acetaminophen, a common over-the-counter (OTC) painkiller, can result in liver failure and even death. Because of this, the FDA is considering recommendations to place new restrictions on the drug. But this is only the latest in a long string of stories that call the safety of various OTC pain relievers, allergy medicines, and other drugs into question.

How can you be sure that what you are taking is safe or even effective? What’s more, how can you know for sure if the generic you buy is the same medicine as the brand-name drug? And how do all those formerly prescription drugs that are now available without a prescription fit in? With all these concerns and choices, a trip to the local drugstore can be overwhelming.

“The key,” says Norman Tomaka, a certified consultant pharmacist, in Melbourne, Fla., “is to know what you want and need before you go into the store.” Tomaka is also a spokesman for the American Pharmacists Association. “When you’re walking along the medicine aisle is no time to window shop or impulse buy.”

Read the Medicine’s Label — Carefully

“Reading the label on an over-the-counter drug is the single most important thing,” says Tomaka. The FDA mandates that each OTC drug label must clearly list the active ingredient and the amount of the active ingredient. Labels also need to state what the medicine’s intended use is. “Educate yourself,” Tomaka says, “even if you can’t pronounce the active ingredient’s name. Look at the drug ingredient and look at the indications to find out what it is used for.”

The information on the label can also help you decide between a generic and a brand-name OTC drug product. If you are considering saving money by buying a generic drug, Tomaka says, compare the active ingredient and amounts in the generic vs. the brand name OTC product. “For example, if you are purchasing an antihistamine, read the ingredient and amount. If the store brand or generic brand is identical to the trade brand, it will likely have the same effects on your symptoms.”

 

Pain Management: How to Choose a Painkiller

For Headaches

Best OTC options Start with acetaminophen (Tylenol) or an NSAID (ibuprofen or aspirin). For a killer headache, try a med that contains caffeine.

For Chronic Pain

Best OTC options Acetaminophen or NSAIDs are good for flare-ups, but NSAIDs can irritate the stomach, and acetaminophen is potentially toxic to the liver.

For Fever, Sore Throat, Flu

Best OTC options Acetaminophen or NSAIDs. Start with acetaminophen; NSAIDs can irritate your stomach.

For Menstrual Cramps

Best OTC options NSAIDs, especially naproxen (Aleve) and ibuprofen; they cut the production of cramp-causing prostaglandins.

For PMS

Best OTC options Naproxen or ibuprofen. They short-circuit the production of prostaglandins.

 

Pain clinic – how to choose the right one

Choosing a pain clinic

Choosing a pain clinic can be a challenge, especially if you have moved to a new community. It is always a good idea to ask for recommendations. If you have a chronic or disabling condition, you will likely need a specialist who understands your particular health needs. Asking friends, neighbors, and coworkers is a good way to start, but ultimately you will have to decide which pain management doctor is best suited to your individual needs and situation.

Finding the best pain clinic – is the doctor Board Certified?

Most practicing physicians in the U.S. are board certified. Before scheduling the appointment make sure that a specialist you want to see has indeed the necessary credentials to run his or her medical practice. For example, Dr. Escobar is Board Certified by the American Board of Anesthesiology, the American Board of Pain Medicine and Diplomat of the American Academy of Pain Management. He has been practicing in the area for over fifteen years. He has lectured in the community as well as mass media on various topics in Pain Management. That’s why Pain Care Specialists of Florida is a pain clinic is considered to be one of the leading pain management practices in South Florida and is so respected in the community. For further information about the practice, here is the link to the clinic’s website.

Insurance plans – do they cover this pain clinic?

Keep in mind, that your insurance plan may restrict your choices to a group of plan-approved physicians or sometimes offer financial incentives to use one of the doctors on the plan. It is prudent to always check the terms of your insurance coverage to find out whether the plan will cover visits to the specialist you are considering. How much will you have to pay out-of-pocket for visits to this provider if they do not participate in your health plan? It is worth doing your research to find out which pain clinic accepts your insurance plan. Some of the clinics, including the Pain Care Specialists of Florida accept all PPO insurances. Find out more about insurance plans

Convenient locations of the pain clinic

The location does matter especially if your condition requires initial frequent visits for consultation and treatments. In order to meet their patients’ needs